List of gig economy companies (Ofer Abarbanel online library)

The following is a list of gig economy companies. The list includes only companies that have been noted by sources as being former or current gig economy companies.

Background

The Congressional Research Service defines the “gig economy” as:

the collection of markets that match providers to consumers on a gig (or job) basis in support of on-demand commerce. In the basic model, gig workers enter into formal agreements with on-demand companies to provide services to company’s clients. Prospective clients request services through an Internet-based technological platform or smartphone application that allows them to search for providers or to specify jobs. Providers (gig workers) engaged by the on-demand company provide the requested service and are compensated for the jobs.[1]

In 2019, Queensland University of Technology published a report stating 7% of Australians participate in the gig economy.[2] 10% of the American workforce participated in the gig economy in 2018.[3] According to a 2019 Bank of Canada report, 18% of Canadians worked in the gig economy for non-recreational reasons.[4] Around 2018, 15% of China’s workforce, representing over 110 million people, was involved in the gig economy.[3] In 2019, the World Bank estimated that globally, fewer than 0.5% of people in the “active labor force” take part in the gig economy.[5]

List of gig economy companies

Accommodation

Company Based in Description
Airbnb  United States[a] An online home rental service[6][7][8]
CouchSurfing  United States[a] An online home rental service[9]
FlipKey  United States An online home rental marketplace[10][11]
Onefinestay  United Kingdom[a] An online rental service[12]
Vrbo/HomeAway  United States[a] An online home rental service.[13][14][11] In July 2020, HomeAway was merged with Vrbo.[15]
Xiaozhu  China An online short-term home and apartment rental platform[16]

Caregiving

Company Based in Description
Care.com  United States[a] An online platform for hiring caregivers[17][18]
Luna  United States An online platform for physical therapy delivery
Heal.com  United States An online platform that allows doctors to perform house calls[19][20]
Pager  United States An online platform that connects healthcare providers and patients[19]
Sittercity.com  United States An online platform for hiring caregivers[21]
Soothe  United States[a] An online massage service provider[22][23]
Talkspace  United States An online platform to connect to therapists[24]
UrbanSitter  United States An online babysitter company[25]

Delivery

Company Based in Description
Amazon Flex  United States[a] An online delivery service[1]
Cargomatic  United States An online delivery platform that connects drivers with customers[26]
CitySprint  United Kingdom A courier service[27][28]
Deliv  United States An online delivery service[29][30]
DPDgroup  France[a] An online parcel delivery service[31]
Dunzo  India An online delivery service[32]
eCourier  United Kingdom A courier service[33]
ekart  India A courier service[34]
GoPuff  United States A convenience store delivery service[35]
Hermes Group  Germany[b] An online delivery company[36][37]
Rappi  Colombia[c] an online delivery service[38][39][40]
Roadie  United States Online delivery[41][42][43]
Shipt  United States An online delivery service[44][45]
Shyp  United States Was a courier service company. Now dissolved.[46]
UK Mail  United Kingdom An online parcel delivery service[31][47]
Yodel  United Kingdom An online parcel delivery service[31][47]

Grocery

Company Based in Description
Farmdrop  United Kingdom An online grocer with food sourced from local farmers[48]
The Food Assembly  France[b] An online farmers’ market[49]
Instacart  United States[d] An Internet-based grocery delivery service[1]

Food

Company Based in Description
Deliveroo  United Kingdom[a] An online food delivery company[50][51][52]
DoorDash  United States Online food delivery[53]
Delivery Hero  Germany[a] Online food delivery[54]
Drizly  United States[d] An alcohol delivery service[55]
EatStreet  United States An online food ordering service[56]
Ele.me  China An online food delivery service[57]
Foodora  Germany[a] An online food delivery service[58][59]
Foodpanda  Germany[a] An online food delivery platform[60]
Glovo  Spain[a] An online food delivery service[61][62]
Grubhub  United States Online food delivery[63]
Just Eat  United Kingdom[a] Online takeaway food delivery[52][64]
Just Eat Takeaway  Netherlands[a] Online food delivery[65]
Menulog  Australia[a] Online food delivery[66][67]
Munchery  United States Was an online food delivery service[68]
OrderUp  United States Was an online food delivery service[69]
Postmates  United States Delivers restaurant-prepared meals and other goods[7]
Seamless  United States An online food delivery service. Now a subsidiary of Grubhub[70]
SkipTheDishes  Canada An online restaurant ordering and food delivery company[71][72]
Swiggy  India An online food delivery platform[32][73][74][75]
Uber Eats  United States[a] An online food delivery platform[62]
Wolt  Finland[a] Online food delivery[76]
Zomato  India[a] An online food delivery platform[32]

Education

Company Based in Description
VIPKid  China An online platform for Chinese students to receive lessons from fluent English-speaking teachers[77]

Freelancing platforms

Company Based in Description
Airtasker  Australia An online marketplace for outsourcing tasks[2]
Amazon Mechanical Turk  United States An online crowdsourcing website for performing tasks[78]
Figure Eight Inc.  United States An online work platform to complete tasks[1]
Freelancer.com  Australia[a] An online freelancing platform[1]
Hello Alfred  United States An online platform for completing tasks[79]
InnoCentive  United States An online platform where problem solvers can receive monetary rewards from organizations[80][81]

Business and technical services

Company Based in Description
Andela  United States[a] An online platform for training software programmers in Africa and connecting them with clients[82][83]
Catalant  United States[a] A matchmaking platform for office work. Was formerly known as HourlyNerd[84][85]
Expert360  Australia An online platform for matching independent business consultants with clients [86]
Field Agent  United States[a] A platform for retailers to request in-store information from users[30]
Field Nation  United States An online marketplace that matches IT and other freelancers with corporate clients[87]
Gigster  United States An online platform to complete software projects[88][89]
Kaggle  United States An online platform for data science competitions[86][81]
Managed by Q  United States An online office management platform company[53]
PeoplePerHour  United Kingdom An online freelancing platform[90]
Shiftgig  United States An online staffing firm[91]
Toptal  United States[a] An online freelancing platform[92]
Upwork  United States[a] An online freelancing platform[1]

Creative services

Company Based in Description
99designs  Australia[a] An online platform to connect graphic designers and clients[93]
Crowdspring  United States An online platform for creative services[94]
Fiverr  Israel[a] An online marketplace for freelance services[95]
Tongal  United States[a] An online platform that connects businesses in need of creative work with writers and directors[96]

Home services

Company Based in Description
AskforTask  Canada An online marketplace where people can outsource their daily tasks[97]
Bellhops  United States An online moving service[98]
GreenPal  United States An online landscaping network company[99]
Handy  United States[a] An online home services company[1]
Helpling  United Kingdom[b] An online platform for cleaning services[100]
HomeAdvisor  United States An online platform that connects homeowners to contractors[101]
Homejoy  United States Was an online maid company. Now closed[102][103][104]
Pimlico Plumbers  United Kingdom A plumbing firm[105][106]
Rover.com  United States An online dog-walking service[63]
TaskRabbit  United States An on-demand freelance labor service[1]
Thumbtack  United States An online platform that connects people to professionals[107][108]
Wag  United States An online dog-walking service[63]
YourMechanic  United States An online platform that connects car owners with mechanics[109]

Legal services

Company Based in Description
LegalZoom  United States An online platform that connects consumers with lawyers[110]
Rocket Lawyer  United States
United Kingdom
An online platform that connects consumers with lawyers[110]
UpCounsel  United States An online marketplace for legal services[111][112][113]

Retail

Company Based in Description
Carousell  Singapore[a] An online marketplace for selling goods[114][115]
Etsy  United States[a] An online marketplace for handmade goods[116]
Lazada Group  Singapore[a] An online marketplace for selling goods[114][115]
Meituan-Dianping  China An online food delivery, consumer products and retail service[117]

Transportation and parking

Company Based in Description
Addison Lee  United Kingdom A minicab firm[118]
Bird  United States[a] An online electric scooter sharing platform[119][120][121]
BlaBlaCar  France[a] An online marketplace for carpooling[122][123][124][125]
Blacklane  Germany[a] An online transportation network[126]
Bolt  Estonia[a] An online transportation network company[34][127]
Bridj  Australia A private commuter shuttle service[1]
Cabify  Spain[a] A ridesharing company[128][129]
Careem  United Arab Emirates[a] A transportation network company[130]
Carma  Ireland[a] An online transportation network company[88]
Chariot  United States A commuter shuttle service[131]
DiDi  China[a] An online ride-hailing service[117]
DriveNow  Germany[b] An online carsharing service[36]
Easy Taxi  Brazil[a] An online transportation network company[132]
EasyCar  United Kingdom An online carsharing service[133]
Free Now  Germany[b] A transportation network company[134]
Getaround  United States[a] An online car-sharing service[135]
Gett  Israel[a] A transportation network company[134]
Gojek  Indonesia[e] An online transportation network company[136][86]
Grab  Singapore
Indonesia[e]
An online transportation network company[114][115][137]
Hailo  United Kingdom An online transportation network company[138]
HopSkipDrive  United States A transportation network company for children[139]
Juno  United States An online transportation network company[53]
JustPark  United Kingdom An online platform that matches drivers with parking spaces[133]
Kakao T  South Korea[e] An online transportation network company[140]
Lime  United States[a] An online transportation company[63]
Luxe  United States An online parking service[103]
Lyft  United States[d] A transportation network company[1]
Meru Cabs  India An online ridesharing company[141]
Ola Cabs  India[a] An online transportation company[60]
Sidecar  United States Was an online transportation company. Now closed[78][88]
Spin  United States An online scooter sharing platform[142]
Turo  United States[a] An online carsharing platform[143][144]
Uber  United States[a] An online transportation network company[1]
Via  United States[a] An online transportation network company[63]
Wingz  United States An online transportation network company[145]
Yandex  Russia[a] An online transportation network company[5]
YourParkingSpace  United Kingdom An online platform that matches drivers with parking spaces[146]

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Ofer Abarbanel – Executive Profile

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